Category Archives: News

January 13th, 2012: Customizing Streaming Video Playback

Last year at IALLT 2011, BYU introduced a system for customizable playback of streaming video. Since then, they have worked to improve the player functionality and implemented the technology within the Spanish curriculum. A team of developers have created a “video text” base on the Colombian telenovella Yo soy Betty, la fea that was piloted last semester and is again being used with enhanced features this semester. The presentation will describe the history of the project, the development of the content and a demonstration of the player and authoring tools.

Screenshot of HTML 5 Video Interface (Image by H. Hendricks-2012)


Customizing Streaming Video Playback: A Progress Report
Harold Hendricks, BYU Humanities Technology & Research Center, IALLT President-Elect
Friday, January 13th, 2012
12pm – 1pm Pacific

UPDATE: the recording of this session is now available.

Registration Open for SWALLT 2012 at ASU!

Theme: Language Learning Centers and Internationalization: Supporting Global Connections,
March 23-24, 2012, Arizona State University, Tempe AZ

Internationalization and globalization have become nearly ubiquitous goals across education over the last several years. Universities, community colleges and other institutions are emphasizing connections with the broader world, establishing campuses and programs across the globe, and welcoming international partners and students to their institutions and curricula. For the faculty, administrators, and language learning center personnel tasked with implementing these goals, questions abound regarding how best to use technology to support global outreach, study abroad programs, faculty engaged in international collaboration, student exchanges, remote campuses and courses, and distance learning.

December 9th, 2011: Digital Storytelling as Participatory Language Learning

Felix Kronenberg will present a recent grant-funded digital storytelling initiative. His presentation will cover various aspects of digital storytelling in the L2 curriculum, such as identity and identities formation, automaticity, motivation, individualization and individual learner differences, agency, multimodality, learner anxiety and “losing face,” narrative structure, and assessment.

Felix Kronenberg
Felix Kronenberg | Assistant Professor

Digital Storytelling as Participatory Language Learning
Felix Kronenberg, Assistant Professor and Director of the Language Learning Center, Rhodes College
Friday, December 9th, 2011
12pm – 1pm Pacific

UPDATE: the recording of this session is now available.

November 10th, 2011: Sharing is Caring

Over the past few years, the Oberlin CILC has developed quite a few in-house tools to make our lives easier.  Some of these tools tackle problems that are common enough to merit sharing, and we have begun making the source code for these applications freely available.  In this presentation, you’ll find out about a few of our more interesting projects, which include a WordPress class-blogging package, a WordPress blog manager and a usage-tracking package for computer labs.  Additionally, you’ll learn how you can install and configure these applications on your own servers and use them to bring peace and tranquility to your work life.

(Please note: due to the Veterans Day holiday on Friday the 11th, this month’s SWALLT Online presentation will take place on Thursday, November 10th from 12pm-1pm)

Sharing is Caring
Justin Locsei, Educational Technology Specialist, Oberlin College
Thursday, November 10th, 2011
12pm – 1pm Pacific

UPDATE: the recording of this session is now available.

September 9th, 2011: If You Build It, Will They Come?

The opening of the UCSF Library’s new Teaching and Learning Center (http://tlc.ucsf.edu) brought together a number of departments and services into one location: interprofessional smart classrooms, the Kanbar Center for clinical simulation and telemedicine, and the Technology Commons, which houses a large lab, a computer classroom, a number of multimedia workstations with specialized hardware and software, as well as support staff for both informational and instructional technologies. This presentation, focused on the Technology Commons, will include a brief review of the planning process, but will largely cover outcomes and lessons learned, as well as the impact these co-located facilities have had on usage of the Technology Commons and other Library services.

photo credit: gc communications (via flickr)

I was lucky to start my educational technology career in a highly-respected language center with a lot of personality. For someone with a background in informational technology, this was a revelation: centers didn’t need to be boring, sterile, and intimidating. In fact it’s better for everyone when they’re not. Every couple of years, someone sounds the death knell for learning centers, and frankly I agree: the old model of rows upon endless rows needs to die. Not because, as Joshua Kim asserts, learning centers are being forced into obsolescence by the influx of students with their laptops and iPads and mobile devices. The old model needs to die because it never worked that well to begin with; for decades students have learned in spite of those environments, not because of them. Increased and widespread access to authentic materials and experiences isn’t making anything obsolete, it’s just making it obvious how wrong we’ve been all along.

So then, what should centers look like? How do you build a space that isn’t obsolete before it opens? What do you when you inherit, are told to build, or have no option other than a center that looks like the one above? Please join us at Friday’s session, or share your thoughts in the comments!

If You Build It, Will They Come?
Ryan Brazell, Learning Technologies Specialist, UC San Francisco / SWALLT President-Elect
Friday, September 9th, 2011
12pm – 1pm Pacific

UPDATE: the recording of this session is now available.

Reminder to Vote – Deadline February 28th

Dear SWALLT Members,
IALLT has asked regional group leaders to remind and encourage members to vote in the IALLT elections.
After going over recent IALLT announcements and thoroughly researching the candidates, I would like to share some of my own reasons why voting is especially important this year.
1. There are six outstanding candidates including four from the SWALLT region.
2. New international IALLT affiliations with IndiaCALL and AsiaCALL promise to greatly expand the depth and breadth of the IALLT global community and to raise the importance and prestige of the entire organization. Your vote will help to determine how new relationships will be cultivated and new bridges built.
3. IALLT’s dynamic, enterprise level web platform now allows IALLT to model the kind of innovation that challenging times demand.  Your vote is needed to select a candidate with the vision and experience to inspire and operationalize such innovation.

The hard work of the IALLT Board and its members has positioned IALLT to become more truly international in scope, and the  organization’s web presence is now infrastructured adequately to uphold and expand IALLT’s mission.  There has never been a more exciting time to be or become an IALLT member.  On behalf of the SWALLT Board, I encourage you to add your voice.

Vote Online – http://www.iallt.org/elections (login required)
You must be an IALLT member in good standing to vote.  You may become a new member or renew your membership on the IALLT site at this link.  If you are unsure whether it is time to renew your IALLT membership, you may inquire at members@iallt.org

Most Sincerely,

Joseph Kautz, President, Southwest Association for Language Learning Technology
Head, Stanford Digital Language Lab

SWALLT/NWALLT 2010

SWALLT/NWALLT 2010 Conference: Sustainable Language Learning Technology
Friday and Saturday, October 15–16, 2010

Reed College, Portland, Oregon

The conference will begin at 1 p.m. on Friday, October 15 and formal presentations will conclude at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 16. Conference participants can check in and pick up materials beginning at 12:00 noon on Friday, October 15.

A schedule is available here, and session descriptions are available here.

SWALLT-NWALLT 2010 Flyer

How can we use the ever-changing array of technological tools and services to facilitate lasting, meaningful language learning? How do we decide which emerging technologies are worth the investment of time and energy? How can we work together to make the most of our limited resources? Join us in the beautiful Pacific Northwest to talk about these and other current issues in language teaching and learning with technology. This conference will be of interest to anyone involved in language teaching or language center management, either at the K-12 level or in higher education. The program will include presentations, panel discussions, and workshops, as well as plenty of opportunities for casual conversations.

About the conference site

The conference will be held at Reed College, a small, private liberal arts college in Southeast Portland, Oregon. As one of the country’s most environmentally conscious cities, Portland is an ideal location for a conference focused on sustainable practices in language learning and teaching with technology. Reeds campus and its surroundings offer many possibilities for exploring the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest.

Reed is approximately fifteen miles southwest of Portland International Airport (PDX) and is easy to get to by car or by using public transportation. The map below includes some local landmarks; well continue to update it until the conference.

Accommodations

We have reserved a block of rooms at the Aloft Portland Airport Hotel, conveniently located near the airport and on the light rail line for easy access to Reed.

If you have questions about accommodations, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

SWALLT/NWALLT Conference in Portland, Oregon, October 15-16, 2010

The Southwest and Northwest Associations for Language Learning Technology will hold a joint regional group meeting October 15-16, 2010 at Reed College in Portland, Oregon.

We welcome proposals for individual or joint presentations, panels, workshops, and posters that showcase technology-enhanced language learning and teaching. Our theme is “Sustainable Language Learning Technology” and our focus will be on which current and emerging technologies will best enhance our limited resources. How can we use the ever-changing array of technological tools and services to facilitate lasting, meaningful language learning? How do we decide which emerging technologies are worth the investment of time and energy? How can we work together to make the most of our limited resources? Join us in the beautiful Pacific Northwest to talk about these and other current issues in language teaching and learning with technology. This conference will be of interest to anyone involved in language teaching or language center management, either at the K-12 level or in higher education. The program will include presentations, panel discussions, and workshops, as well as plenty of opportunities for casual conversations.

The deadline for proposal submission is June 15, 2010. Submit your proposal at:

https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dGY4TkQ2U2NnX1l3Zk1ZV3B5aWk0bkE6MQ

or through the link at http://swallt.org/conferences/

See you there.

Modern Language Association Call for Papers

DIVISION ON THE TEACHING OF LANGUAGE
2011 MLA SESSIONS
CALL FOR PAPERS

Session title: Foreign Language Cultural Literacy and Web 2.0

The 2009 Horizon Report on emerging technologies details a multiplicity of technology trends that are already having an impact on foreign language teaching. These drivers of change in higher education include awareness of globalization, openness to accelerated information sharing, and advances in collaborative networking and collective knowledge production.

For one of its 2011 MLA sessions, the Committee on the Division of Language Teaching seeks papers that examine how practices and tools associated with Web 2.0 and the use of instructional technology more generally can be effectively used to enhance foreign language teaching and learning. Presentations are invited on multi-media curriculum design that advances foreign language literacy objectives, especially models that can serve a broad range of departmental contexts.

We are especially interested in research that has been conducted in the following areas:

  • Initiatives that enhance cultural learning and the development of foreign language skills through the use of instructional technology (e.g., global simulations, gaming, asynchronous or synchronous exchanges);
  • Discussion and analysis of applications for the incorporation of personal mobile devices into language classes;
  • Outcomes assessment (qualitative and quantitative) related to the implementation of technology-enriched curriculum in language instruction contexts;
  • Curriculum development initiatives that strengthen the ability of institutions to offer less commonly taught languages;
  • Examples of cross-institutional collaboration in foreign language instruction that demonstrate or show the limitations in the efficacy of technology-enhanced teaching.

Abstracts should include a detailed description of the paper’s organization, as well as an explanation of how it fits into the theme of the session. Please send a one page abstract to Professor Charlotte Melin at melin005@umn.edu by March 10, 2010.

Fernando Rubio
Co-Chair and Associate Professor
Department of Languages and Literature
University of Utah
(801) 581-4610